Basic Information About Hair Loss

200285526-002

200285526-002Do you believe that you are the only person in the world who has ever lost their hair? You are most certainly not! Androgenic alopecia, which is the most common type of hair loss, affects more than 50% of all men. It is also a problem for 20-40% of the entire female population. You are far from alone. In fact, you are in the majority.

Androgenic alopecia is caused when hair follicles (where hair grows from) start to decrease in size and the hair growth phase is significantly reduced. This means one simple thing: More of the hair follicles will come to a state of rest before being shed. The good thing is that this condition does not affect all of the hair follicles at once. This is the reason that some places on the scalp seem to have more hair than others.

What Is The Cause For Androgenic Alopecia? As boys age, their hair follicles come in contact with androgen, which is a hormone that controls the physical appearance and development of masculine features. Once this happens, they become sensitive to the androgen and lay a path for androgenic alopecia to become a problem later in life. Prevent hair follicles from coming in contact with androgens will stop this condition from every becoming a problem. Grow new hair with the rebuild hair program.

To offer a few more details about how this works, there are two types of androgen; testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). An enzyme that is known as 5-alpha-reducer is what turns testosterone into DHT. Once this is formed, it can become bound to any androgen receptors that are in the hair follicles. This will decrease the activity of the follicle, the hair growth cycle will stop, the hair shaft will decrease in diameter and as time moves on, hair will stop growing altogether.

Females experience things very similar to the way that males do. Androgen in women stems from the combined activity of the adrenal glands and ovaries. Hair loss in females is sometimes related to other factors, including pregnancy and menopause.